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, and ambassador from malta. and, of course, a special welcome to ambassador alexis tsipras, the u.s. ambassador to hungary. so many of you are here. i know many were here for the inauguration, the first working day of the second term. our first major event here at brookings in the second term. and yesterday president obama's second inaugural address has already called a manifesto for liberalism, bolstered his supporters on a range of issues, and his credits are already complaining he is preaching to the choir, or worse, that he reaffirmed the worst feelings, that he is a socialist. and president obama anticipated that criticism by putting his talk into the context of his include ongoing skepticism of central authority, and calling it a fiction that all societies ill can be served through government alone. and as the u.s. looks around the world today, president obama highlighted a few big challenges, asia, africa, latin america and the middle east. but, frankly, americans are used to trouble in those places. but for the last three years for the first time since the end of the cold war, europe ha
announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> hello from new york. i'm chris hayes here with alexis goldsteen, neil borofsky, stephanie kelton, professor of economics at the university of missouri kansas city and joe wisenthal. in the wake of the news of tim geithner's departure to be replaced with jack lu, we're talking about the geithner legacy. and because i think when you look at the first term, he's, i think it's hard to argue anyone was a more influential cabinet member. you know, the signature things that happened particularly in the midst of the crisis have been shepherded by tim geithner, he lasted all four years. they say he was incredibly successful -- incredibly influential. we're talking about his legacy. one of the things we said before break is this argument about the bailouts and the cost. the idea that, you know, people throw around the $700 billion figure which is a huge eye popping number and then the argument on the other side that time geithner will say taxpayers made money on the bailout. or you basically just said that. and neil, you have an issue with that. >
to meet our obligations. that's not who we are. major, then alexis. >> as you noted, jay, the situation in algeria is very fluid and you are trying to discern fact from fiction. once that process is finished, does the president intend to communicate with the country about what he knows and what has happened? >> well, i think -- i have no scheduling announcements to make on behalf of the president, and i think we're focused now on finding out and seeking clarity about the events in algeria. and once we know more and once we have more that we can convey to you, we'll make assessments based on that. >> does the white house believe that there is something at work in mali or algeria that is moving or shifting in a way that's maybe catching the american public's attention for the first time? threat patterns? different areas of conflict? an aggressiveness on al qaeda or affiliates that needs perhaps more communication with the american public, a greater sense of what's actually going on here? >> we here in the white house and throughout the administration are intensely focused on al qaeda and
:57 on this tuesday, january 1st of 2013. good morning. we're keeping an eye on your roads and alexis davies is in for danella seabrook. >> alexis? >> we had an accident on the outer loop of the beltway at old georgetown road. police left the scene. a car is still there so use caution approaching. elsewhere, 395 at 14th street bridge looking good right now. no delays. and looking at about a 1-minute ride from the beltway to the 14th street bridge. >>> right now cloudiness around the metro area and that's what's been happening over the last 12 hours. sprinkles the areas in green passing through the metro areas and points south and east and maybe a few sprinkles or flurries later today and right now we're in the 30 to near 40s and all above freezing and we'll hover near 40 during the afternoon with a lot of clouds and a small chance of a sprinkle or flurry and colder weather with (woman) 3 days of walking to give a break cancer survivor a lifetime-- that's definitely a fair trade. whoo! you walk with friends, you meet new friends, and you keep those friendships. it was such a beautiful experie
. >> john is okay. >> so, alexis who scared everybody is trying to change his image. met with stroible of germany. how's it going? >> it's going well. he is not someone to be scared about. he's a politician who says the obvious. that in europe, and especially in greece, we need change. we need to move away from austerity. austerity creates a lot of unemployment, is a negative spiral of recession, more austerity, more recession. and so nowadays in greece, we have 26% of the workforce being unemployed. >> right. >> and this percent is more than 50% among the -- >> you know what, a lot of economists around the world would say, though, the solutions that you want would also lead to higher unemployment, because you don't want to necessarily lower wages, or lower the minimum wage. you want to keep union control in place, and so things that make greece -- greek very uncompetitive in the world market. they're more expensive relative to other potential employers around the world. >> have a different analogy. greece is a custom intensive country, it's not a labor intensive country. besides it's
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